Using “Either or” vs “Neither Nor” in English

Do you know the differences between “Either or” and “Neither nor” in English? Check the lesson below and find out the differences.

“Either or” vs “Neither nor”

Either/or

  • Either refers to any one of the two things or people.
  • Either is always considered singular in a sentence.
  • Either/or is a correlative conjunction.
  • We use either/or for connecting things which are the same types, phrases, clauses or words.

Example Sentences:

  •  You add either one or two cloves of garlic.
  • Well, I think she’s either Russian or Polish.
  • Do either of you smoke or drink heavily?
  • His yawns suggested he was either tired or bored.
  • You cannot have it both ways. You must either stay at home or come with us.
  • He could always find fault with something, either in my writing or in my personality.

Neither/nor

  • Neither is used as a conjunction.
  • This structure, “neither/nor”, is used to connect the same kind of word or phrase in the sentence.
  •  Neither makes a negative statement about two people or things.

Example Sentences:

  • Neither he nor his friends came back.
  • Neither pen nor pencil can express.
  • We can neither change nor improve it.
  • There was neither food nor drink.
  •  Neither you nor I can be held responsible.
  • She had neither the time nor the inclination to help them.
  • Love can neither be bought nor sold.

Either or vs Neither nor | Infographic

Either or vs Neither nor

Using "Either or" vs "Neither Nor" in English 1

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